The Bible TV Miniseries: This Is It!

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When you read this post, the first night of the epic television docudrama and miniseries, The Bible, is history.

I’m eager to hear your thoughts and impressions.  Maybe you watched it and plan to tune in for the next four Sunday nights.  Maybe you didn’t see it because you didn’t know it was scheduled to air (on the History channel, reportedly the only network interested in the project).  Maybe you don’t care–and that’s okay with me.

Hollywood couple Mark Burnett (producer of Survivor, Celebrity Apprentice and The Voice) and Roma Downey (Touched By An Angel), created The Bible and see its story as a love story between God and mankind, according to an article in Charisma News.  

What’s not to love about a good love story?  No doubt there will be diverse interpretations of the series, from evangelical to mystical.  I hope that love and tolerance are at the heart of all the conversations.

Mega-church leaders like Joel Osteen, T. D. Jakes and Rick Warren, plus many community-based churches have built curriculums around The Bible.  It’s getting a secular push too from movie theater trailers (that’s where I first learned of it) and Facebook.

Let the conversation be inclusive

The airing of The Bible has the potential to be the modern-day Ten Commandments; in fact, with electronic and social media, interest will probably surpass the Charlton Heston classic.  I know it holds my fascination as both an entertaining movie and as a storytelling portrayal of the best book ever written.

Here’s my hope for the conversation around The Bible:  that no one–from the Bible’s literal interpretation believers to New Thought followers–claim an exclusive view.  Please, let’s be inclusive.

Joel Osteen says The Bible will “impact believers and non-believers alike,” according to Urban Christian News.  From my vantage point, about seven hours prior to its airing, I’d like to take it a step further.  I think the show’s impact will reach far beyond traditional church ideas.

While churches discuss its significance, perhaps the miniseries will kick-off a pre-Easter tide of community conversation as well.

Let love be the keystone

In the end, The Bible is entertainment.  Its special effects are eye-popping, reason enough for watching.

The real significance of its entertainment, however, is the impact it has on its viewer.  Many people simply want to be entertained–the “watch and walk away ” crowd.  Nothing wrong with that.

Many others–myself included–want the movie’s entertainment to leave us thinking.  What is the show’s meaning?  What is it’s purpose?

Could it be love?  Is The Bible the ultimate love story?  If so–and I’m going out on a limb since I’m writing this pre-airing–then let’s let love be the focal point of any conversation we have.

Tolerate those with whom you’re discussing the movie.  Accept their right to their beliefs without trying to change their minds.

Most of all, in any conversation you have, let love set the tone, let love be the keystone.

I predict amazing results and I can’t wait to hear yours.  Will you post them in the comments section below?

Thank you, Inspiration Showers, for the photo.

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